1.18
TCC Radio: “Loving Your Enemies” by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

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Martin Luther King Jr.

“I would rather die than hate you.”

Jesus was nonviolent. He taught the nonviolent love of friends and enemies. Today we remember the Christian prophet and preacher Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. who was willing to die for his faith. Listen to him preach on “Loving Your Enemies” here: Loving Your Enemies. Dorothy Day on MLK & more after the jump:

1.15
Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

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Fr. Hesburgh and Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Jan. 15th would have been the 86th birthday of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. who used nonviolence, civil disobedience, and Christian teaching to advance the cause of civil rights in America. Honor his legacy by re-reading his “Letter from a Birmingham Jail” in which he urges actions consistent with Christ’s “extremist” love, and quotes St. Augustine who said that, “An unjust law is no law at all.” Read it in The Atlantic here: Martin Luther King Jr.’s Letter from a Birmingham Jail

6.14
The Case for Dedicated Dads

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Martin Luther King Jr. serving dinner to sons

Father’s Day is June 21st. 1 out of 3 American children grows up withoutbiological father. The data is clear, fathers make a huge difference in the lives of their children. Read more from The Atlantic here: The Case for Dedicated Dads. (Above: Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. serves dinner to his sons.)

3.7
Catholics were Prominent in 1965 Selma March

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Fr. Ouellet in Selma, Albama
As we mark the 50th anniversary of the voting rights demonstrations led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. in Selma, Alabama, Paul Murray recalls the role that Catholics played in the movement. Read it in The National Catholic Reporter here: Catholics were Prominent at Selma March

1.29
Alone, Yet Not Alone

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Rabbi Heschel and MLK Jr. David Brooks writes for The New York Times about how the experience of faith differs from the popular perception of religion. “Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel described one experience of faith in his book God in Search of Man: ‘Our goal should be to live life in radical amazement…Everything is phenomenal. …To be spiritual is to be amazed.'” Read it here: Alone, Yet Not Alone (Above: Rabbi Abraham Heschel and the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.)